NOT YOUR DADDY'S LOG CABIN

It's Paper Piecing for the 21st Century

Not%20Your%20Daddy's.._edited.jpg

Picture is the finished top only

Paper piecing continues to be one of many quiltings' challenges. There are so many variables and so many ways to get it wrong, right?

Wrong!  I've taken the mystery out of paper piecing by making it easy to do and much faster and efficient.  But you'll have to be the judge of that.

I've often heard that Log Cabin is a great beginner's pattern.  I say bull crap.  Even after all these years of quilting, the Log Cabin remains a pattern I've yet to do.  Why?  Because it's not as easy as we might think; however, paper piecing it makes it much easier.

This the traditional log cabin with a bit more of a contemporary and somewhat Asian look, which makes it, as far as I'm concerned, "Not Your Daddy's Log Cabin"

THINGS TO HAVE ON HAND

Your pre-cut and any extra fabric

Sewing machine with a new needle, thread and pre-wound bobbin, regular piecing foot and 1/4" foot 

Pins, and just in case, a seam ripper

Rotary cutter (with a new blade) and ruler - 6"x12" works fine

Small cutting mat 9" x 12" is fine

Pencil or pen

17lb Translucent Vellum 8 1/2" x 11"*

To order 100 sheets click here

To order 50 sheets click here

To order 30 sheets click here

Highlighters (any color)

Two different-colored Sharpies

Add-A-Quarter ruler (the longer the better)

Add-An-Eighth ruler (very, very helpful)

Paper and  fabric scissors

Invisible Scotch Tape (any brand)

Elmer's Disappearing Purple Glue Stick (preferred)or any washable, acid free glue stick            

Glue Stick (2).jpg

WHY VELLUM?

If you don't feel like reading all of the following stuff, just skip to the last paragraph.

 

First of all, it makes the paper piecing process much easier and the pattern preparation much faster.  When I first developed my method of paper piecing I used regular copy paper because I wanted to eliminate the need to purchase special papers.  However, in the early years I experimented with all different kinds of paper and discovered 17lb vellum.  It was perfect for the process.  And when I taught live classes I supplied the vellum patterns as part of the class materials.

Then came virtual classes and you all needed to print your own patterns.  Copy paper is easily available and almost everyone has copy paper.  It works, but there's more pattern prep to do because copy paper isn't smooth and isn't translucent.  For most of my patterns, copy paper is just fine because the patterns don't have lots of segments.  "Not Your Daddy's Log Cabin" blocks have twenty-two segments and regular copy paper doesn't quite cut it.  It's usable, but not ideal.  Thus, the need for vellum.

You can look for your own 17# vellum, but the links I've supplied are brands that I've used before and I can definitely say that they are my favorites.  If you choose to look for your own, make sure it's 17#, 8-1.5" x 11" and feeds through your printer smoothly.  Also, if you've never taken one of my classes before, you'll just have to trust that whichever quantity you order, one sheet of paper goes a long way.  

 

So the bottom line is this...get the vellum.  It goes through the printer the same as copy paper  You'll find it changes everything and streamlines the process, eliminating time.  There are links above for 100 sheets, 50 sheets or 30 sheets.  The 100 sheet option is the most economical, and order early to make sure you have your vellum in time for class.

LET'S TALK FABRIC

I think what makes this quilt so striking is the use of only 3 fabrics...a lighter fabric, which becomes almost the focus fabric, a dark fabric, which is kinda like a background fabric, and solid black. The black strips helps create the illusion of curves as well as a stained glass look.  That doesn't mean you have to follow the same guidelines, but I would recommend that you at least stick with the solid black.  Your other fabrics can be colors of your choice. But I do recommend darker and lighter fabrics for good contrast.  I also chose fabrics that appear solid from a distance, but have an allover print.

Each finished block measures 10" x 7 1/2 "

The wall hanging measures 60" x 45" without borders.

CUTTING SPECS

You can cut your segments (logs) in two different ways:

 

  • First you can cut the fabric by using the chart as it's written.  You'll have  all the "logs" and triangles you'll need along with extra strips of fabric.  So you'll have plenty of extra pre-cut strips for more blocks or to use in case you have any need for extra segments.

  • Or you can cut the widest strips first and 1 fewer of each of the subsequent strips.  Count the number of segments you have and then use the leftover fabric from the previous strip(s) to cut the remainder, giving you the total number you need.  For instance, cut three 11" black strips and then cut the number of "logs" you'll need.  Then you'll cut three 8" strips, count the number of logs you have, and then make up the difference from the leftover 11" strip, etc.  If this makes no sense to you, go with  the first option.

Start with at least 3-1/2 yards of Black Fabric and 2 yards of Light Fabric and

2 yards of Dark Fabric.

 

Then cut your logs and triangles as shown below:

Not Your Daddy's Log Cabin©

For the Logs

Color

Black

 

 

 

 

Light

Fabric

 

 

Dark

Fabric

 

 

 

# of Strips

4

4

3

2

4

2

2

1

2

2

2

1

2

Strip Width

11"

8"

6-1/4"

4-1/4"

3-1/4"

8-1/4"

6"

4-1/2"

3-1/4"

8-1/4"

6"

4-1/2"

3-1/4"

Cut Into

Logs

2" x 11"

2-1/14" x 8"

1-1/4" x 6-1/4"

1-1/2" x4-1/4"

1" x 3-1/4"

1-1/2" x 8-1/4"

1-3/4" x 6"

1" x 4-1/2"

1-1/4" x 3-1/4"

1-1/2" x 8-1/4"

1-3/4" x 6"

1" x 4-1/2"

1-1/4" x 3-1/4"

Total # of

Logs

72

72

72

72

144

36

36

36

36

36

36

36

36

For the Triangles

Color

Light Fabric

Dark Fabric

# of

Strips

3

3

Strip Width

3-1/2"

3-1/2"

Rectangle

Size

2-1/2" x 3-1/2"

2-1/2" x 3-1/12"

Sub Cut into HRTs

(Half Rectangle Triangles)

Total # of

Triangles

72

(36 Pairs)

 

72

(36 Pairs)

You'll Learn:

The basics of paper piecing

The "No More Tears"© method

Storm at Sea basics

Precise block and quilt top construction